FOODIE UPDATE (Food Packaging Chemical BPA ‘found in digestive system of 86% of teenagers)

The material is used to harden polycarbonate plastics and make epoxy resin, which is found in the lining of food and beverage containers.

Bisphenol A (BPA) used for increasing plastic’s dexterity was “found in the digestive system of 86% of teenagers,” a new study by the University of Exeter revealed.

Researchers studied 94 teenagers and found that it was almost impossible to avoid the BPA which has been used since the 1960’s but is most commonly found in reusable drink containers, food storage containers, processed foods, DVDs, children’s toys, and store receipts.

The synthetic material is used to harden polycarbonate plastics and make epoxy resin, which is found in the lining of food and beverage containers.

Lynn Ladbrook, Chief Executive of Breast Cancer UK, told the Sky news, “BPA is listed as a substance of very high concern for good reason – it is both a reproductive toxicant and has endocrine disrupting properties.”

“Breast Cancer UK has long called for BPA to be prohibited from use in food, drinks and till receipts and until it is, it is likely to continue to show up in humans,” Ladbrook added.

Professor Lorna Harries, the project leader said, “Teenagers are one of the groups of people in our population that have the highest levels of BPA in their urine when you measure it,” according to Sky News. “Although we’re not quite sure why that is, one theory is because teenagers eat more junk food than the rest of the population and junk food is a particularly rich source of BPA,” she added.

In 2017, the European Chemicals Agency listed BPA as a substance which contains specific properties which work as an endocrine disruptor.

17-year-old Freya Hester, a participant in the study noted, “I am really passionate about plastic pollution so knowing BPA is in here, we are polluting our bodies as well as the environment, which is really shocking to me.”

Another participant, Amalia Gimbuta, told Sky News: “If you’re in a rush and you’re shopping you don’t have time to peel off the packaging to try and work out if it has BPA or not.”

“So finding packaging that you know for certain doesn’t have it in is really difficult.”

Use of BPA was banned in baby plastic bottles in a majority of European nations 2011.

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